Urgent Care Horizon Scanning Volume 2 Issue 3

May 4, 2010

GPs in Emergency Departments improve patient care

May 4, 2010

Source: Primary Care Foundation

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of Publication: March 2010

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell:  This report, commissioned by the Department of Health, found that the increasing number of GPs and primary care nurses working in Emergency Departments can improve the quality of patient care.  However, there is little evidence for claims that this approach drives down costs or avoids inappropriate hospital admissions.

The Foundation estimates that around half of the Emergency Departments across the country offer some sort of primary care service.  The proportion of attendances that could be classified as primary care was between 10% and 30%.  This contrasts with widespread assumptions that up to 60% of patients could be diverted to GPs or primary care nurses.  

Length of publication:
 102 pages


Access to urgent health care

May 4, 2010

Source: Emergency Medical Journal 2010 27 (3) p. 186-188

Follow this link to extract

Date of publication: March 2010

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell:  This commissioned article outlines the current system for urgent care in the UK.   It considers that these systems have evolved over time and are often complex for patients, carers and healthcare providers, with poor knowledge of the available services by all parties. 

The article considers some of the issues around emergency departments, out-of-hours care , and NHS Direct 24.  The authors summarise that we currently have a complex system and need to move to a more integrated system that requires a coordinated approach with clear goals and crosses current organisational and professional boundaries. This will require strong leadership, which does not see a purely bricks and mortar solution and will be best delivered within local health economies.  

The article concludes with a number of principles for improving the urgent care system

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Alternative services to deliver urgent care in the community

May 4, 2010

Source: Emergency Medical Journal 2010 27 (3) p. 183-185

Follow this link to extract

Date of publication: March 2010

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell:  This commissioned article considers different models of urgent care, looking at triage/signposting; pre-hospital care services; alternatives to the ED; and the role of networks such as social care services.

The authors conclude that in order to deliver patient-centred effective and efficient urgent care in the community, system-level thinking is required at policy, practice and research levels.  The public cannot be expected to necessarily make the contact that is most appropriate to their needs.  Those seeking urgent healthcare need to be reassured that whichever point of access they use, they will consistently receive a safe, high-quality service.

New models of assessment, triage and delivery need to be implemented across providers and be evaluated rigorously across sectors. A number of recommendations are made to develop efficient alternative responses.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


NHS emergency planning guidance: planning for the development and deployment of Medical Emergency Response Incident Teams in the provision of advanced medical care at the scene of an incident

May 4, 2010

Source: Department of Health

Follow this link to full text

Date of publication: March 2010

Publication Type: Best Practice

In a nutshell: This is best practice guidance to National Health Service (NHS) organisations in developing and deploying Medical Emergency Response Incident Teams (MERITs). Guidance provides background and context for MERITs, identifies the roles and responsibilities of NHS organisations and provides an outline of the scope and purpose of MERITs.

Length of publication: 12 pages

Some important notes: It builds on the guidance given in the underpinning section of the NHS Emergency Planning Guidance: immediate medical care at the scene.


Revision of professional roles and quality improvement

May 4, 2010

Source: The Health Foundation

Follow this link for full text

Date of publication: February 2010

Publication Type: Report

In a nutshell: Report addresses the question of whether non-physician clinicians (without a medical degree) working as substitutes to or supplements to  clinically trained physicians effects quality of care outcomes using a best evidence approach.  Paramedics are included in the non-physician group.  The report concludes that in specifically defined areas quality of care is maintained and in some cases improved.

Length of publication: 122 pages


London’s new trauma system

May 4, 2010

Source: Healthcare for London

Follow this link for full text

Date of Publication: April 2010

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell:  This fact sheet announces the launch of a new trauma system in London from 6 April 2010.  The system is made up of four trauma networks, each with a major trauma centre for treating the most seriously injured patients, linked in with a number of local trauma units for treating those people with less serious injuries.  Ambulance crews have all been trained in the use of a protocol to take injured people to the hospital most suited to their needs.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.